Title

Emotional Intelligence, Discipline and Academic Achievement of High School Students: Comparison of Archival and Current Profiles

Date of Award

2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master in Education, Major in Guidance and Counseling

Department

Education

First Advisor

Cornelia C. Soto, PhD

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to determine whether emotional intelligence and student discipline have a relationship on academic achievement among high school students in one of the private schools in Quezon City, S.Y. 2018–2019. This study used a quantitative non-experimental design. Emotional intelligence, student discipline, and academic achievement of the students were used as constructs. The researcher conducted a comparative study between archival and present data of the participants when they were in Grade 7 and Grade 12 respectively. Two-year data of the participants were used to find out if there is a relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Self- Discipline on Academic Achievement. Havighurst's Developmental Tasks was used as a framework to explain the maturation of the participants. The following were the findings of this study: The emotional intelligence, discipline, and academic achievement of the respondents showed a significant difference when they were in Grade 7 and Grade 12. Also, the respondents' profiles on the other subscales of emotional intelligence, particularly on stress management and adaptability, showed sufficient evidence to prove that there is a significant difference when they were in Grade 7 and Grade 12. In terms of association, the result showed that there is no sufficient evidence to prove that emotional intelligence is associated with academic achievement in Grade 7 and Grade 12. The results showed that there is no sufficient evidence to prove that discipline is associated with academic achievement in Grade 7. Hence, in Grade 12, the findings show that there is sufficient evidence to prove that discipline is associated with academic achievement. Emotional-Social Intelligence- based activities should be integrated into the curriculum affirmed by the studies conducted by Jordan, McRorie, and Ewing (2010) and Skipper and Brandenburg v (2013). A student-centered discipline may be considered for further research in improving student discipline. Also, the committee may create disciplinary strategies that are developmentally appropriate for students. Furthermore, a measure of emotional intelligence suited for Filipinos may also be developed to determine accurately the emotional intelligence of Filipino students.

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