Title

College and Career Readiness and Academic Achievement of Public Senior High School Students Across the Academic Strands

Date of Award

2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Education, major in Educational Administration

Department

Education

First Advisor

Maria Resurreccion P. Alejo, PhD

Abstract

Taking off from the College and Career Readiness model of David Conley, the focus of this descriptive and correlational study was to (1) describe the academic achievements and college and career readiness of public senior high school students, (2) to examine whether academic achievement is a predictor of college and career readiness or not, and (3) to test if there is a significant difference between the college and career readiness of students across academic strands. Purposive sampling was used in choosing the respondents for this study. One- hundred eighty-three senior high school students from a public school in Mandaluyong City were asked to answer the researcher-made College and Career Readiness Survey, which had 81 items, where indicators are subdivided into four facets of College and Career Readiness model namely: key cognitive strategies, key content knowledge, academic behaviors, and contextual skills and awareness. The questionnaire was found to have a very high level of internal consistency with a Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient reliability score of .966. On the other hand, students’ academic achievement was taken from the results of Basic Education Exit Assessment of the Department of Education with the approval of the school principal of the participating school. Frequency, percentage, mean, and standard deviation were used to determine the academic achievement and college and career readiness of the respondents. To find out if academic achievement is a predictor of college and career readiness or not, linear regression was used. And finally, the One-Way ANOVA test was computed to v find out whether there was a statistically significant difference between the students’ college and career readiness across academic strands. Based on the results, it was found out that students’ academic achievement falls within the low proficient. Respondents generally rated their college and career readiness as “most likely ready.” The results showed that academic achievement is a predictor of students’ college and career readiness. It also showed that there is no significant difference on the students’ college and career readiness among the senior high school students across academic strands. This implies that the three facets of students’ academic achievement influence their college and career readiness. The result of the study is parallel to the findings of the literature, which tell us that academic achievement is correlated to students’ college and career readiness. This finding was revealed in many studies of college and career readiness stating that a student’s level of academic achievement has a larger impact on college and career readiness in which, academic indicators are clearly the predictors of college and career readiness. This suggests that further research be conducted on other predictive factors that might influence college and career readiness in the Philippines. Due to the limited generalizability of this study, it is also suggested that factor analysis be applied on the instrument used in this study, which perhaps, and hopefully could lead to a local model for college and career readiness.

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